Booze News: Distilled in Room 215

A blog about the Baltimore City Liquor Board

What happened at the Liquor Board on January 5, 2017.

Written by Becky Witt

11:00 a.m.

I. Regular Items (New, Transfers, Expansions and Hardships):

Applicant Darryl Strange
Business Name Truth Lounge, LLC
Trading As Truth Lounge
Address 4507-09 Belair Road
Type of License Class “BD7” Beer, Wine & Liquor License
Reason for hearing Application to transfer ownership, request to add live entertainment.
Hearing notes

Mr. Hurdle, for his client, proffered that Mr. Strange is applying for the transfer of ownership of an existing BD-7 tavern license, the only one in a four-block radius. Mr. John Zorzit is the secured creditor, who took the license back after a financial hardship. The application to transfer the license was submitted in early October. Mr. Strange has been remodeling since then. Mr. Strange then testified that he plans to open a bar and lounge that caters to people 30 and older. He said that he wants to be part of the community, not a hindrance. Chairman Matricciani pointed out that the place had a bad history, according to the information submitted to them by people opposed to the transfer. Strange replied that he intends to run the bar differently than it had been run in the past. The applicant spoke briefly about his experience in the industry and his plans to hire a manager and other staff, including security. The current capacity of the bar is less than 150 people.

Mr. Strange said that he had been trying to reach out to a Ms. Jackson, president of the Frankford community association, whom he contacted at the advice of the state delegate for the district and a representative from HARBEL Community Organization. Ms. Jackson was out of town and not able to attend the hearing or negotiate an MOU.

Commissioner Greenfield expressed concerns about the sanitation complaints raised by the community in writing and in photographs. Strange replied that there is a lot of trash around in community, but he is open to suggestions about how to deal with the problem.

Six community members then expressed concerns about the proposed establishment. One neighbor complained about shootings and violence that have increased over recent years. She also complained about trash everywhere around the property, and her husband testified that there was no place to put a dumpster on the property. They wondered whether the building structure itself was up to code and safe for customers. The neighbors also complained that John Zorzit, the secured creditor and seller of the license, keeps acquiring and selling liquor licenses even though he has a criminal record. Several community members testified about concerns with patrons blocking alleys and streets with their cars. The applicant replied to all of these concerns, stating that he will work with the community members to find solutions, including arranging for parking in nearby lots.

During a community member’s questioning, Mr. Strange said that he did not know a woman named Carolyn Jones very well. However, Commissioner Moore pointed out that Ms. Jones had signed the liquor license transfer application as a character witness on Mr. Strange’s behalf. After some further questioning, Mr. Strange said that he had known Ms. Jones in some capacity for nine years. Commissioner Moore agreed with the community member that the signatures on a petition in support of the project appeared to her layperson’s eye to be identical.

Commissioner Moore noted that the photographs submitted to the Board showing trash were “alarming” and cautioned Mr. Strange that he will need to educate himself on how to run his business properly. She reiterated that the neighbors’ concerns were serious.

Chairman Matricciani and Commissioner Moore both stated that this situation could use an agreement in writing. Mr. Hurdle replied that his client was open to the idea. Ms. Jackson is not really available to negotiate the MOU. The community members who testified at the hearing were not happy with this suggestion that Ms. Jackson be the main contact person, because they said that the boundaries of the associations in the area did not cover them. The three commissioners agreed to postpone the decision for this case until the neighbors and the applicant had tried to work out an agreement.

Commissioner Moore finished the hearing by asking when the bar closed. Mr. Hurdle did not know. Moore replied that the Board needs to know whether the license is valid or not before they can transfer it.

Zoning B-3-2
Neighborhood Frankford
Area demographics 15% White, 79% Black, 2% Asian; 2% Hispanic ethnicity; 35% households have children under age 18; 15% households below poverty line; median household income: $39,144.11
Does corp entity exist, in good standing? Yes; yes.
Location of entity’s principal office Baltimore, MD
One applicant reside in Balt for 2 yrs? Yes
Pecuniary interest of Baltimore City resident 100%
Attorney for licensee Mr. Abraham Hurdle
# in support 1
Attorney for community None
# of protestants 6
# of inspectors/police officers 0
Result of hearing Postponed
Vote tally None taken
Portions of state law cited in decision None
Other reasons given for decision None
Issues raised in audit present in this case or other issues observed

This hearing highlights the lack of useful information in the Board’s files. There are only a few inspectors’ reports from 2013, 2014, and 2015, and they are basically blank.

The former Executive Secretary sent a letter to the transferring licensee at this address in January 2015 stating that the licensee had not paid his license fee for the 2014-2015 license year, which was due by the end of March 2014. There seems to be no way that he could have legally operated his business with a valid liquor license between May 1, 2014 and the date of the letter, January 27, 2015, a period of 271 days. The letter tells the licensee: “[i]f it is your desire to ensure that the alcoholic beverages license once issued to your establishment is not terminated,” he should submit his license fee as soon as possible. First, a license is not “terminated” by the Board in this situation; rather, a license expires by operation of law if it is not used for a period of at least 180 days. There is no action by the Board that makes the license unusable, and there is nothing that the Board can do to revive the license if it is expired. Second, the executive secretary seems to understand that this license is already expired under the 180 day rule, since no hardship extension was applied for and 180 days had passed.

Mr. Hurdle’s statement that he did not know when the bar closed is also a red flag; presumably, when purchasing an asset, the purchaser’s due diligence shoudl include a determination of whether the asset actually exists or has expired.

Applicants Christopher Sheffert, Concetta Scotto-Sheffert and Michael Sabracos
Business Name City Line Food, Inc.
Trading As Trade Name Pending
Address 6506 Belair Road
Type of License Class “BD7” Beer, Wine & Liquor License
Reason for hearing Application to transfer ownership with continuation of live entertainment and outdoor table service, request for off-premise catering and delivery of alcoholic beverages.
Hearing notes

Mr. Sheffert testified that he has 18 years of experience in the restaurant industry, including as a general manager at Ruby Tuesday’s. He is currently alcohol management certified. He spoke with the president of the Cedmont Community Association, and she is not opposed to the transfer. They plan to make renovations in the future, if they can raise the funds.

The 18-year owner of the business testified that he has been running the bar as an Irish pub, with outdoor table service and live entertainment (DJ, Irish bands, karaoke) but not off-premises catering.

Zoning B-3-1
Neighborhood Rosemont East
Area demographics 0.7% White, 96.6% Black, 0.2% Asian, 1% Hispanic ethnicity; 35.4% households with children under 18; median household income $30,864.90.
Does corp entity exist, in good standing? Yes; yes.
Location of entity’s principal office Baltimore, MD
One applicant reside in Balt for 2 yrs? Yes
Pecuniary interest of Baltimore City resident 5%
Attorney for licensee Mr. Robert Taylor
# in support 3
Attorney for community None
# of protestants 0
# of inspectors/police officers 0
Result of hearing Approved
Vote tally Unanimous
Portions of state law cited in decision None
Other reasons given for decision None
Issues raised in audit present in this case or other issues observed None
Applicants Harman Arneja, Gurmohan Arneja and Ronald Sanders
Business Name Har-Jas Corporation
Trading As Hamilton Liquors
Address 5418 Harford Road
Type of License Class “A” Beer, Wine & Liquor License
Reason for hearing Application to transfer ownership.
Hearing notes

Mr. Hurdle proffered for his clients that they are requesting the transfer of ownership of an existing Class A license. Mr. Sanders is currently a licensee for this location. The two other applicants are father and son, and they have twenty years’ experience in the industry. The son will be there every day, and the other two licensees will help out on occasion. He submitted a letter of support from Hamilton Main Street. There are no plans to make changes to the business.

Zoning B-2-2
Neighborhood Hamilton Hills
Area demographics 37% White, 55% Black, 1% Asian; 2% Hispanic ethnicity; 33% households have children under age 18; 5% households below poverty line; median household income: $57,951.01
Does corp entity exist, in good standing? Yes
Location of entity’s principal office Silver Spring, MD
One applicant reside in Balt for 2 yrs? Yes
Pecuniary interest of Baltimore City resident 0.05%
Attorney for licensee Mr. Abraham Hurdle
# in support 3
Attorney for community None
# of protestants 0
# of inspectors/police officers
Result of hearing Approved
Vote tally Unanimous
Portions of state law cited in decision None
Other reasons given for decision None
Issues raised in audit present in this case or other issues observed None
Applicants Andrew Dunlap and Michael White
Business Name The Sobo Taco Spot, LLC
Trading As Banditos
Address 1118 S. Charles Street, Units 110 & 111
Type of License Class “B” Beer, Wine & Liquor License
Reason for hearing Application to transfer ownership, request to expand premise to include 1118 S. Charles Street, Unit 101 for business.
Hearing notes

Mr. Prevas proffered that Bandito’s is an existing restaurant with a BD-7 tavern liquor license that has been in operation since 2012. The proposed expansion is into a 2,000 square foot space recently occupied by a yogurt shop. There is an MOU with the South Baltimore Neighborhood Association. The boundary line is Cross Street, and the building in question is just three or four doors down from the boundary line.

Mr. Dunlap explained that the concept for the expanded location will be a craft deli, hamburger place, and beer and wine bar; currently, there is nothing like it in Federal Hill, so he has to go outside the neighborhood to find it (Hampden, R. House, Belvedere Square). He said that the MOU contains restrictions negotiated with SBNA. There will be a brand new kitchen, with a renovation nearing half a million dollars, including HVAC. There will be sixty seats in a dining environment, with a bar on one side. They will have occasional acoustic music.

Several Federal Hill neighbors testified in opposition to the project. They complained that Mr. Dunlap has not been consistent in how he had explained his project to them at their community meeting. One neighbor argued that there is no need for the new restaurant, that the business will become a “megabar,” and that their primary source of revenue is alcohol, not food. If the request was for a restaurant, FHNA would not oppose it. In addition, they asked how it could be possible to run two businesses under one liquor license. The community members stated repeatedly that they are overwhelmed with bars that are ever-increasing in size and that the police cannot effectively control the crowds, especially at closing time.

A doctoral student from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health testified about the impact of alcohol outlets on violent crime in communities. Federal Hill is unusually oversaturated with alcohol outlets: one per 81 residents. After providing some estimated calculations of the costs of dealing with oversaturated communities, she concluded that the board should deny the expansion.

The executive director of the Downtown Baltimore Family Alliance then testified that she had been verbally accosted by a Bandito’s patron when she was with her young child. She also pointed out that if the goal is to serve food at a high end deli, the kitchen shouldn’t be closing several hours before the bar closes.

Mr. Prevas reiterated that the property has been consolidated and that the applicants have gone through negotiations with SBNA.

Commissioner Moore expressed concern about the community impact and increased bar stools. Chairman Matricciani also was concerned about the late night hours with no food sales. The applicant responded that they are paying a lot of money in rent, and if it’s not him expanding into the space, it will be someone else.

Zoning B-2-3
Neighborhood Federal Hill
Area demographics 90% White, 3% Black, 3% Asian; 3% Hispanic ethnicity; 15% households have children under age 18; median household income: $73,342; 8% households live below the poverty line.
Does corp entity exist, in good standing? Yes
Location of entity’s principal office Baltimore, MD
One applicant reside in Balt for 2 yrs? Yes
Pecuniary interest of Baltimore City resident 50%
Attorney for licensee Peter Prevas
# in support 3
Attorney for community None
# of protestants 5
# of inspectors/police officers 0
Result of hearing Approved
Vote tally 2-1 (Moore dissenting)
Portions of state law cited in decision None
Other reasons given for decision

During his decision, Chairman Matricciani said that he agreed that communities have suffered from the overconcentration of alcohol outlets and that the legislature will have to step in and do something about it. He did not state any reasons why he voted to approve the transfer, other than to say that the licensee’s attorney had made a good presentation.

Commissioner Moore voted against the application because of the harm likely to be done to the community.

Commissioner Greenfield noted that the property had already been consolidated by zoning, so the Liquor Board can’t do anything about his opinion that it doesn’t make sense to have two different businesses under the same liquor license. The opponents can always call 311 and can always protest.

Commissioner Moore chimed in that just because a license is approve-able doesn’t mean that they should approve it.

Issues raised in audit present in this case or other issues observed

The issue of oversaturation and density of liquor licenses is an concern that can only be addressed at the issuance of a license (or expansion, in this case); it cannot be addressed through through violation hearings or through protests of renewal. The Board cannot pass along this responsibility to the state legislature, which has already had a moratorium in place to address this issue since 1968. The legislature gives discretion to the Board for exactly the situation that was before them during this hearing: on a case by case basis, to evaluate “(1) the public need and desire for the license; (2) the number and location of existing license holders; (3) the potential effect on existing license holders of the license for which application is made; (4) the potential commonality or uniqueness of the services and products to be offered by the business of the applicant; (5) the impact of the license for which application is made on the health, safety, and welfare of the community, including issues relating to crime, traffic, parking, or convenience; and (6) any other factor that the local licensing board considers necessary.” If the commissioners believed, as all three seemed to, that the public health and safety of the community would be negatively impacted by this expansion, they should have voted not to approve it. In fact, the addition of more bar stools in Federal Hill makes it more difficult for communities to report problems to the city and state, because it becomes increasingly difficult to pinpoint the source of problems related to drinking if the streets are full of patrons from many different bars and restaurants.

The consolidation of the property has nothing to do with the Liquor Board’s responsibility to evaluate the application and make its decision based on the above factors.

Applicants Mustafa Jackson and Roberto Silva
Business Name Four One Four, LLC
Trading As Kings and Diamonds
Address 414-416 E. Baltimore Street
Type of License Class “BD7” Beer, Wine & Liquor License
Reason for hearing Request for a hardship extension under the provisions of the Alcoholic Beverages Article § 12-2202.
Hearing notes

Mr. Mustafa Jackson and Mr. Roberto Silva appeared but are not the licensees. The actual licensee at the establishment, Robert Jackson, testified that he is doing some renovations and wants to reopen and transfer the license to his son, Mustafa, with his friend. Silva testified that they would like to open in March.

Commissioner Greenfield noted that this explanation did not reflect what was in his letter requesting a hardship extension; Robert replied that his son will become a partner and will eventually buy the business from him. Mr. Silva said that he is a successful club owner and DJ for the past decade or more.

Zoning B-5-2
Neighborhood Downtown
Area demographics 39% White, 37% Black, 16% Asian, 3% 2 or more races; 5% Hispanic ethnicity; 9% of households have children under age 18; Median Household Income: $38,146; 18% households live below poverty line
Does corp entity exist, in good standing? Yes; no.
Location of entity’s principal office Baltimore, MD
One applicant reside in Balt for 2 yrs? Not provided in docket
Pecuniary interest of Baltimore City resident Not provided in docket
Attorney for licensee None
# in support 3
Attorney for community None
# of protestants 0
# of inspectors/police officers 0
Result of hearing Approved
Vote tally Unanimous
Portions of state law cited in decision None
Other reasons given for decision None
Issues raised in audit present in this case or other issues observed

Two commissioners noted that there is a negative history of violations at this location.

The board did not, in this hearing, make any findings of fact or conclusions of law, as required by basic administrative law principles. The relevant statute says that “[t]he Board may grant the extension if the Board finds after a hearing that existing hardship caused the closing or stopping of business operations.” There was nothing on the record at the hearing about what the hardship was and whether it caused the closing or stopping of business operations. Mr. Jackson testified that he’s been doing some renovations, but voluntary renovations may or may not be considered a “hardship” that “caused the closing or stopping of business operations.” Jackson’s letter told a different story of a frivolous lawsuit against his business; the Board did not ask any questions about that situation.

1:00 p.m.

II. Violations:

Licensees George Divel, III, William Matricciani and Donna Matricciani
Business Name Weidog, LLC
Trading As Playbook
Address 6700 German Hill Road
Type of License Class “BD7” Beer, Wine & Liquor License
Reason for hearing

Violation of Rule 3.09(b): Rest Room Facilities and Health Regulations – September 23, 2016 – At approximately 10:00 PM, members of the Baltimore City Health Department, Baltimore City Police Department, and BLLC conducted a joint investigation into the establishment. Upon entering the establishment to conduct a routine inspection, Health Department officials observed hot and cold holdings temperature violations, bare hands handling ready to eat foods, and improper hand washing. As a result of the violations the establishment was closed for the evening.

Hearing notes

Chairman Matricciani recused himself from this hearing.

Mr. Peter Prevas, for his client, admitted the violation. Inspectors from the Liquor Board and Health Department testified briefly about the violations that they observed when they visited the bar as part of the inter-agency Social Task Force. The health inspector explained that particular establishments are inspected in the evenings as part of the Social Task Force when the health inspectors can’t get in during the day or when the police or other agencies receive complaints.

In mitigation, Prevas stated that his client had spent over $5000 in addressing the issues, he admitted the violation, and he was already closed for six days to get his kitchen up to the health code.

The commissioners noted that this particular establishment has a history of violations.

After more complaints from Mr. Prevas that his client had been singled out unfairly, Commissioner Moore noted that the agencies have made a special effort to work together on enforcement.

Zoning B-2-2
Neighborhood Graceland Park
Area demographics 44% White, 25% Black, 2% 2 or more races; 20% Hispanic ethnicity; 32% households have children under age 18; median household income: $30,864.31; 22% households live below the poverty line.
Does corp entity exist, in good standing? Yes; yes.
Location of entity’s principal office Baltimore, MD
One applicant reside in Balt for 2 yrs? N/A
Pecuniary interest of Baltimore City resident N/A
Attorney for licensee Mr. Peter Prevas
# in support 1
Attorney for community None
# of protestants 0
# of inspectors/police officers 3
Result of hearing Responsible. $2500 fine.
Vote tally Unanimous
Portions of state law cited in decision None
Other reasons given for decision “Healthy record of violations”
Issues raised in audit present in this case or other issues observed None
Licensees Tesfaye Birru and Fikremariam Worku
Business Name Jano Ethiopian Restaurant & Lounge, LLC
Trading As Jano Ethiopia
Address 34 S. Eutaw Street
Type of License Class “B” Beer, Wine & Liquor License
Reason for hearing

Violation of Rule 4.05 (a) and (b): Prohibited Hours – October 30, 2016 – At approximately 2:30 AM BLLC Chief Inspector Mark Fosler, Inspector John Howard, Inspector Andy Perez, Inspector Darryl Clark, and Inspector John Chrissomallis conducted a special investigation at the establishment. At this time, BLLC Inspectors Perez and Clark entered the establishment posing as patrons in an attempt to order an alcoholic beverage. Both Perez and Clark were granted entry to the establishment by security and walked to the bar area on the first floor. Perez and Clark observed “4 to 6” patrons, three of which were observed consuming alcoholic beverages. Inspectors then proceeded to upstairs lounge area. Upon reaching the lounge area, Perez and Clark observed approximately “20 to 30” patrons dancing and consuming alcoholic beverages. Perez and Clark then approached the bar in the lounge area and ordered two (2) bottles of Corona from the bartender. The bartender informed the Inspectors that the bar was closed. However, the licensee, Mr. Worku, who was present at the bar area and overheard the bartender deny the Inspectors request, instructed the bartender to serve the Inspectors. Inspector Perez paid $10.01 for the two (2) bottles of Corona and was subsequently served by the bartender. While waiting for their alcoholic beverages, Inspectors observed another patron approach the bar and purchase shots of what seemed to be “Crown Royal Whiskey.” Inspectors Perez and Clark left the establishment and then reported their findings to Inspector John Howard who entered the establishment and violated it for serving after hours.

Violation of Rule 3.02: Cooperation – October 30, 2016 – At approximately 2:30 AM BLLC Chief Inspector Mark Fosler, Inspector John Howard, Inspector Andy Perez, Inspector Darryl Clark, and Inspector John Chrissomallis conducted a special investigation at the establishment. At approximately 2:40 AM, Inspector Chrissomallis attempted to gain entry to the establishment in an effort to make contact with Inspector John Howard who was inside writing a violation to the licensee for operating after hours. Inspector Chrissomallis approached the location and attempted to gain entry to the location, but was greeted by the licensee, Mr. Worku, and a security guard. Inspector Chrissomallis identified himself as an Inspector with the BLLC and showed his agency issued identification and badge and requested entry to the establishment. Mr. Worku acknowledged who Mr. Chrissomallis was and then proceeded to become belligerent. Mr. Worku cursed at Inspector Chrissomallis and repeatedly denied him entry to the establishment. Inspector Chrissomallis informed Mr. Worku about Mr. Howard’s presence within the establishment and the need to ensure that Mr. Howard’s safety and then repeated his request to gain entry. Mr. Worku again denied Inspector Chrissomallis entry. When Inspector Chrissomallis attempted to gain entry he was physically stopped by Mr. Worku. Inspector Chrissomallis contacted the Baltimore City Police Department’s Central District for support. It was at or about this time that Mr. Worku allowed Inspector Chrissomallis to gain entry.

Violation of Rule 2.13: Inspections – October 30, 2016 – At approximately 2:30 AM BLLC Chief Inspector Mark Fosler, Inspector John Howard, Inspector Andy Perez, Inspector Darryl Clark, and Inspector John Chrissomallis conducted a special investigation at the establishment. At approximately 2:40 AM, Inspector Chrissomallis attempted to gain entry to the establishment in an effort to make contact with Inspector John Howard who was inside writing a violation to the licensee for operating after hours. Inspector Chrissomallis approached the location and attempted to gain entry to the location, but was greeted by the licensee, Mr. Worku, and a security guard. Inspector Chrissomallis identified himself as an Inspector with the BLLC and showed his agency issued identification and badge and requested entry to the establishment. Mr. Worku acknowledged who Mr. Chrissomallis was and then proceeded to become belligerent. Mr. Worku cursed at Inspector Chrissomallis and repeatedly denied him entry to the establishment. Inspector Chrissomallis informed Mr. Worku about Mr. Howard’s presence within the establishment and the need to ensure that Mr. Howard’s safety and then repeated his request to gain entry. Mr. Worku again denied Inspector Chrissomallis entry. When Inspector Chrissomallis attempted to gain entry he was physically stopped by Mr. Worku. Inspector Chrissomallis contacted the Baltimore City Police Department’s Central District for support. It was at or about this time that Mr. Worku allowed Inspector Chrissomallis to gain entry.

Violation of Rule 3.12: General Welfare – October 30, 2016 – At approximately 2:30 AM BLLC Chief Inspector Mark Fosler, Inspector John Howard, Inspector Andy Perez, Inspector Darryl Clark, and Inspector John Chrissomallis conducted a special investigation at the establishment. At approximately 2:40 AM, Inspector Chrissomallis attempted to gain entry to the establishment in an effort to make contact with Inspector John Howard who was inside writing a violation to the licensee for operating after hours. Inspector Chrissomallis approached the location and attempted to gain entry to the location, but was greeted by the licensee, Mr. Worku, and a security guard. Inspector Chrissomallis identified himself as an Inspector with the BLLC and showed his agency issued identification and badge and requested entry to the establishment. Mr. Worku acknowledged who Mr. Chrissomallis was and then proceeded to become belligerent. Mr. Worku cursed at Inspector Chrissomallis and repeatedly denied him entry to the establishment. Inspector Chrissomallis informed Mr. Worku about Mr. Howard’s presence within the establishment and the need to ensure that Mr. Howard’s safety and then repeated his request to gain entry. Mr. Worku again denied Inspector Chrissomallis entry. When Inspector Chrissomallis attempted to gain entry he was physically stopped by Mr. Worku. Inspector Chrissomallis contacted the Baltimore City Police Department’s Central District for support. It was at or about this time that Mr. Worku allowed Inspector Chrissomallis to gain entry.

Hearing notes

Mr. Harris, for his clients, admitted the after-hours violation but denied the other three. He requested that the witnesses be sequestered.

Inspector John Chrissomallis testified that he received a call from Chief Inspector Mark Fosler that there were two undercover inspectors at Jano and that the establishment was open well after the required closing time of 2:00am. Chrissomallis was asked to find the Liquor Board inspector who was inside writing up the after-hours violation report. When the inspector tried to go inside, he was met at a side door by the licensee; Chrissomallis said that Worku was intoxicated and aggravated, using curse words and other inflammatory racial language. Worku at one point put his hand on Chrissomallis’s chest to keep him from going inside the building.

The security guard on duty at Jano on the night in question then testified about what he witnessed. He said that there was no physical contact between Worku and the inspector and that they were trying to explain the situation calmly to Chrissomallis.

Zoning B-4-1
Neighborhood Downtown
Area demographics 39% White, 37% Black, 16% Asian, 3% 2 or more races; 5% Hispanic ethnicity; 9% of households have children under age 18; Median Household Income: $38,146; 18% households live below poverty line
Does corp entity exist, in good standing? Yes; yes.
Location of entity’s principal office Baltimore, MD
One applicant reside in Balt for 2 yrs? N/A
Pecuniary interest of Baltimore City resident N/A
Attorney for licensee Mr. Roland Harris
# in support 2
Attorney for community None
# of protestants 0
# of inspectors/police officers 4
Result of hearing Responsible for all charges. $2,000 fine & 3 day suspension
Vote tally Unanimous
Portions of state law cited in decision None
Other reasons given for decision

Previous violation for the same after-hours rule in 2016.

Issues raised in audit present in this case or other issues observed None

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